WHO MyHealth app to launch on March 30th; helps preventing misinformation and observe COVID-19 sufferers

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WHO MyHealth app to launch on March 30th; helps fighting misinformation and track COVID-19 patients

“The WHO MyHealth app is being built as an open-source app, and is being developed by a group of volunteers called the ‘WHO COVID App Collective’.”

The World Health Organisation is progressing steadily in its function in our battle in opposition to the coronavirus pandemic, however contributing to medical analysis just isn’t the one function that it performs. Due to the worldwide nature of the pandemic, there are many misinformative articles on the web about COVID-19, which might probably create important confusion across the viral illness’s signs, cures and really helpful practices. In a bid to primarily deal with this, the WHO, led by a workforce of volunteers which can be consultants in quite a lot of fields, is launching a brand new app for Android, iOS and the online. The app is named WHO MyHealth.

The workforce of volunteers which have come collectively for this mission is formally generally known as the ‘WHO COVID App Collective’, and has former workers of Google and Microsoft, advisors and model ambassadors of the WHO, and different related trade consultants as properly. In a report by 9to5Google, which managed to get their fingers on an early, work in progress model of the app, which revealed that it’s largely the standalone app model of the automated chatbot service that it lately launched on WhatsApp.

Image credit score: 9to5Google

There is sure to be some overlap of options, since each the WhatsApp helpline and the standalone app can be aiming to curb misinformation, supply an official supply of data, collate reportage on COVID-19, supply the most recent numbers, listing down signs and supply self-evaluation instruments for people to verify whether or not they’re exhibiting a number of of the signs which can be typical to COVID-19. The report goes on to state that WHO’s app additionally has plans to ask for entry to a person’s system location, in addition to their location historical past, to carry out ‘contact tracing’ — one thing that even the Indian authorities is believed to be engaged on, with its upcoming CoWin-20 app.

This function, nonetheless, might be controversial, since there are apparent privateness considerations in getting access to a person’s historic location knowledge, and whereas the WHO could also be a trusted supply, there isn’t any assure that cyber attackers is not going to try and infiltrate this data and exploit it at a later date. The WHO MyHealth app can also be going to offer location-specific data and updates in regards to the coronavirus outbreak, making it an all-encompassing app that ought to take away the necessity for anybody to depend on unverified data sources.

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